Article Bank

FOLLOWING PUBLICATION OF EACH ISSUE of the Ontario Arborist magazine, we load copies of our most popular columns and features here in our article bank. In addition to being an invaluable source of information, the online versions contain an added benefit not possible in the magazine – live links. So remember, if you read an article in print and want to visit a link but don't want to type in a long address, simply find the article here and click away. One caveat: articles date back almost 10 years so some of the links referenced in earlier publications may no longer be valid. We do our best to keep them current or remove outdated links but the web changes daily!

Author: Katherine Lord
Issue: October/November 2016
Katherine Lord discusses the disease affecting the Plane Trees of France.
Author: Amanda Carpenter, PT, DPT, CProT, CEAS
Issue: November 2014 - Special Climbing Issue
Amanda Carpenter, PT, DPT, CProT, CEAS, speaks of the importance of staying healthy in the arboriculture industry.
Author: Anne-Marie Roussy, Peter G. Kevan & Adam Dale
Issue: December/January 2015
Sugar maple trees, once common throughout urban and rural areas of southern Ontario, are either disappearing from roadsides or are showing advanced decline. This decline cannot be explained by age alone, as the trees are typically only between 80 and 100 years old, whereas their normal life span is 300 to 500 years...
Author: Anne-Marie Roussy & Peter G. Kevan
Issue: October/November 2014
Pollination mechanisms of maples trees, in general, are poorly understood. Various researchers and authors have wrongfully reported that sugar maple pollination is done solely by insects - technically called entomophily. However, a few have mentioned the possibility of pollination by wind - anemophily, or mixed pollination (i.e. by both - ambophily).
Author: Chris Morrison
Issue: April/May 2014
A collaborative effort between Douglas Wood Large Tree Services of Rockwood, Bartlett Tree Experts and Rockscape Design, both of Bracebridge, to relocate this large 12.5 metre White Pine.
Author: Oliver Reichl
Issue: July-August 2013
A long time ago, in a city far, far away.... I don’t remember how long my “seasonal” employment with this tree company was supposed to last, but I had assumed at least six months. So I was a bit surprised when, somewhere in month five, I came into the office with a set of completed work orders at the end of one Friday and was simply told that today was to be my last day of work. Things were slowing down. I was being laid off. I said, “Yeah, ok” and asked how soon my final cheque and ROE (record of employment) would be ready. I went back outside, finished unloading/stowing gear, said goodbye to my co-workers, and that was pretty much that. Said last cheque and ROE showed up in the mail about a week or so later. Question: What did (or did not) happen that was wrong?
Author: Pat Kerr
Issue: July-August 2013
The primary goal for all arborists – in fact, for all of us – should always be to live well. British Columbia’s Work Safe has added a new department to their accident review process to take this goal one step further then is traditional for arborists. They call it “Human Factor.” In this article, I’ll discuss human factors and throw in some points on the reality of being human in accident prevention. With respect to the latter, what sounds like a relatively simple concept is not always as clear-cut as it seems (like my play on words?).
Author: Brianna Mersey
Issue: July-August 2013
Welcome to the 4th article in a series that will run throughout 2013 in the magazine. If you missed earlier editions, you can find them in our “Article Bank” online. In each issue we will focus on a different aspect of online marketing geared towards small to medium-sized tree care companies. Like it or not, it’s virtually impossible to ignore the new digital reality. So, jump in with both feet and get down to work!
Author: Dr. Peter Kevan
Issue: July-August 2013
Hemlock trees (Tsuga spp.) are native to North America and eastern Asia. They belong to the same family of conifers as pines (Pinaceae). The generic name Tsuga derives from a town in Japan. There are three species native to Canada, and only eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) exists in the east. Contrary to what some may presume, there is no association with these trees and poison hemlock, the plant (Conium maculatum) that was used in the execution of Socrates in 399 BC. The connection seems to have been made because of the similarity of the smell of crushed needles of hemlock trees and the smell of poison hemlock.
Author: Jen Llewellyn
Issue: July-August 2013
I often come across plant problems that can be a little cryptic to solve. We look at wilting leaves and twigs and we can’t help but assume that there is some kind of fungus or a bacterium that’s causing it – maybe even a new one that no one has seen before. Diagnosing plant health issues takes a lot of investigation and if possible, a complete dissection of the symptomatic host.
Author: Peter Duinker et al. (Cnd. Urban Forest Research Group)
Issue: May-June 2013
Why Do Public Values Matter? Trees in the city – or, in other words, the urban forest – do not just happen. They are usually planted and tended by caring people. When their establishment and care are formally programmed, we call it management. Urban forest management is a matter of planning a program of tree establishment and care, and then implementing that program as called for in the plan. Monitoring, learning and re-planning make the whole process adaptive. Thus, the urban forest is an actively managed forest.
Author: Brianna Mersey
Issue: May-June 2013
Welcome to the 3rd article in a series that will run throughout 2013 in the magazine. If you have missed previous issues, you can find them in our “Article Bank” online. In each issue we will focus on a different aspect of online marketing geared towards small to medium-sized tree care companies. Like it or not, it’s virtually impossible to ignore the new digital reality. So, jump in with both feet and get down to work!
Author: Jen Llewellyn
Issue: May-June 2013
It’s Spring. First of all, I just want to say that if you are reading this article and it is still May/June 2013 (I should be specific, hence the inclusion of the year) then… WOW, I am really impressed. It’s May. And you are so organized that you still have time to read! It’s easy to let things like reading updates slip this time of year so I have made this a short article with bits of timely information that you need to know AND that will hopefully make your job easier and/or more profitable in some way – and don’t limit yourself in how you think about that last part.
Author: Grant Beamish
Issue: March-April 2013
The morning of Saturday, September 29, 2012, was picture perfect – sunny and mild with leaves beginning their colourful fall transition. It was an ideal morning to linger over a coffee and read the paper. But by 8:15 am, a swarm of people were assembling at the London, Ontario headquarters of Trojan Technologies: local Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, a purple-clad brigade of students and faculty from Western University, horticultural students from nearby Fanshawe College decked out in full safety gear, local business people and politicians. With shovels in hand, the group of over 250 people were there with a common purpose – to plant several hundred large caliper trees along Veterans Memorial Parkway (VMP) at the east end of the city.
Author: Mark Carroll
Issue: March-April 2013
It’s a winter tradition. Ontario’s arboricultural community gathered for the better part of a week this February to attend educational sessions, visit the trade show and hospitality suite, catch up with colleagues, and generally have a good time learning and interacting with like-minded people. Certified arborist Mark Carroll covered the conference for us this year. We always try to get an insider’s perspective as these events are for you, our members, and only through valuable feedback can we improve in our delivery. So, sit back and relax (hopefully in the spring sunshine) and read on...
Author: Renee Fortune
Issue: March-April 2013
Welcome to the 2nd article in a new series that will run throughout 2013 in the magazine. If you missed the 1st one on email marketing, you can find it in our “Article Bank” online. In each issue we will focus on a different aspect of online marketing geared towards small to medium-sized tree care companies. Like it or not, it’s virtually impossible to ignore the new digital reality. So, jump in with both feet and get down to work!
Author: Paul Hambidge, Treescape Tree Care Professionals
Issue: March-April 2013
Treescape Tree Care Professionals (Ennismore, Ontario) propped a 200 year-old maple tree on The Briars Resort this past December. Read on for full details of the job as well an an insight into the decision-making process.
Author: Jen Llewellyn
Issue: March-April 2013
Several articles ago, I wrote about white pine trees and how I was getting so many calls about their decline in the landscape across southern Ontario. These symptomatic white pines have a few things in common. They were all transplanted into the landscape as fair-sized trees (200 cm and greater), which puts them at a greater risk of transplant stress than younger trees. Secondly, they all seem to be exhibiting some level of sap weeping on the main trunk and also on larger branches. If you cut into these weeping cankers, you will see that the cambium has been killed and has turned a bright brown colour (smaller inset photo). Tree death is gradual; it often takes 3-5 years. As decline progresses, the tree shows increasingly obvious signs of chlorosis, stunted growth, needle drop and dieback.
Author: Guy Meilleur
Issue: Jan-Feb 2013
“Pruning objectives shall be established before pruning.” ANSI Standards remind American arborists to “clearly state what is going to be done to achieve the objective.” But the necessary inspection is not detailed, and habitat for wildlife is not mentioned as an objective. Australian AS4373 Pruning Standards do both: “Prior to pruning being prescribed or undertaken a thorough inspection … should consider hazards, habitats, species, age, condition wind loading, location and the timing of the tree’s biological processes.” This article will focus on pruning for habitat, as practiced in Australia and the US, to set a global context for Canadian work.
Author: Renee Firtune & Brianna Mersey
Issue: Jan-Feb 2013
Welcome to a new series that will run throughout 2013 in the magazine. In each issue we will focus on a different aspect of online marketing geared towards small to medium-sized tree care companies. Like it or not, it’s virtually impossible to ignore the new digital reality. So, jump in with both feet and get to work in the off-season! This issue will focus on email marketing. It's affordable, user friendly and iIdeal for small business.

Our mission is to enhance and promote the care and benefit of trees for present and future generations in Ontario through education, research and awareness.